News Breakdown: November 4-11

Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud chats with his son and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Wednesday. (Saudi Press Agency/Handout via Reuters)

Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud chats with his son and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Wednesday. (Saudi Press Agency/Handout via Reuters)

International

The Paradise Papers, 13.4 million files on offshore investments and tax havens, were released on Nov. 5.
– Their contents have exposed the Queen and Prince Charles of the United Kingdom, British lords, Donald Trump’s cabinet members, advisors and donors and the President of Colombia, among 120,000 other individuals and corporations.

Twenty-six were killed and 20 injured in a mass shooting at a Baptist church in Sutherland Springs, committed by a former member of the U.S. air force whose motive is suspected to be domestic violence against his estranged wife’s family.
– Four per cent of the town of Sutherland Springs were killed. The man was allowed to purchase the semi-automatic rifle he used due to the air force’s failure to submit his conviction of domestic violence to a federal database designed to prevent firearm access.

Heir to the Saudi throne, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, consolidated his control over the country through a corruption purge, the firing of top officials, and the alleged forced resignation of Lebanon’s Prime Minister.
– As many as 500 were arrested. The head of the only remaining military force not under bin Salman’s control, the National Guard, was replaced. The Saudi government is targeting assets and cash worth up to $US 800 million And 26 new judges were appointed.

US Democrats won gubernatorial elections in New Jersey and Virginia, in what has been trumpeted as a victory over “Trumpism.”
– Additionally, Bill de Blasio won re-election as mayor of New York, Sikh Ravinder Bhalla won the election for mayor of Hoboken, and Danica Roem, a transgender woman, won an election for Virginia’s state legislature over a self-proclaimed homophobic Republican.

Louis C.K., Roy Moore, Kevin Spacey and Sepp Blatter were accused of sexual misconduct and sexual assault, some of which was against minors, this week.
– C.K. said the allegations were true and apologized, Moore hit out at the accusations, Spacey said he did not remember the conduct and apologized, and Blatter denied the accusations.

Stephen Bronfman, left, is the chief fundraiser for the Liberal Party and a long-time friend of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, right (Andrew Vaughan/Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Stephen Bronfman, left, is the chief fundraiser for the Liberal Party and a long-time friend of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, right (Andrew Vaughan/Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

National

A top fundraiser and senior advisor to Prime Minister Trudeau, Stephen Bronfman, was named in the Paradise Papers for using tax havens to avoid taxes in Canada, the United States, and Israel.
– This comes at a time where Prime Minister Trudeau has been campaigning to shut tax havens and cut taxes for the middle classes. Bronfman issued a statement saying that he has paid all taxes and has followed the law. The Canada Revenue Agency is investigating all Canadians named in the Panama Papers.

Canada and 10 other countries including Japan and Australia signed their agreement to the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade agreement.
– The countries put out a statement saying an accord has been reached on the “core elements” of the trade agreement. The commitments made by the countries will eventually be ratified and enforced by its members.

The Federal Court has ruled against releasing the warrant allowing Canada’s spy agency, CSIS, to monitor the Chinese embassy in a case against an Ontario man who is accused of attempting to pass national security secrets to China.
– Portions of the warrant and affidavit authorizing the CSIS investigation into the Chinese embassy were disclosed in the course of the case, but the court ruled that disclosing the full document would cause ‘certain injury’ to Canada’s national security.

Prime Minister Trudeau met de facto leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi to talk about the Rohingya refugee crisis on the sidelines of the APEC summit in Vietnam.
– Suu Kyi has been derided for not speaking out over the refugee crisis and condoning the refugees’ expulsion from Myanmar which has been orchestrated by Myanmar’s military, which retains much control over the state. Bob Rae, Canada’s special envoy to Myanmar said that Suu Kyi was willing to return the refugees to her country and to engage in reconstruction.

The office of the ethics commissioner is investigating Finance Minister Morneau for his involvement in pension Bill C-27. Morneau’s family company, Morneau Shepell, sells pensions.
– Morneau is now in the process of selling off his $21 million in shares and placing his other considerable assets into a blind trust. Morneau has been criticized by the NDP and the Conservatives for his conflict of interest and his personal assets.

Members of the Canadian Armed Forces participate in Remembrance Day ceremonies at the Grand Parade in Halifax on Saturday, Nov. 11. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

Members of the Canadian Armed Forces participate in Remembrance Day ceremonies at the Grand Parade in Halifax on Saturday, Nov. 11. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

Local

Remembrance Day was celebrated around the province with ceremonies taking place in most municipalities including a large ceremony at the Halifax Grand Parade.

– This year marks the 100th anniversary of many of the notable battles of the First World War for the Canadian armed forces, including Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele.

The Province of Nova Scotia created the Legal Advice for Sexual Assault Survivors this week to provide free legal advice to sexual assault survivors.
– The program is a three-year pilot project that is receiving $810,000 from the federal government. To be eligible for the program the assault must have taken place in Nova Scotia and the assaulted person must be at least 16.

With the appointment of former chief federal prosecutor Ann Marie Simmons, women make up the majority of judges on Nova Scotia’s Provincial and Family Court.
– Premier Stephen McNeil appointed Simmons in an effort to exceed its goal of gender parity among judges on the Provincial and Family Court.

Nova Scotia justice minister, Mark Furey, is to release the province’s plans for legalizing recreational marijuana by the end of the year.
– The Nova Scotian justice department is analyzing the results of an online survey about marijuana legalization last month which 31,000 people responded to. Provincial legislation around legalization is to be tabled during the spring session of the legislature.

The Atlantic University Sport cancelled the Loney Bowl due to unresolved eligibility issues involving the SMU Huskies football program, awarding the league title to the Acadia Axemen.
– SMU has filed a legal challenge against U Sports, the national governing body of university sport, to have the Loney Bowl finals go ahead. This has been ruled on determining that U Sports had breached the agreement they made with the university on the Oct. 30 on the eligibility of player Archelaus Jack.
UPDATE: The Acadia Axemen won the Loney Bowl against the Saint Mary’s Huskies 45-38 in overtime after a Nova Scotia judge overturned a decision by Atlantic University Sport to cancel the game over an eligibility issue.
– The controversy was over SMU wide receiver Archelaus Jack and whether he was eligible for this season. As Jack made his way onto the field before the game Nov. 14 he was booed.