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King’s president calls for increased international student enrolment

Professors from the Early Modern and Contemporary Studies Programmes, along with members of the King’s Student Union, the Bursar’s office and the Journalism school, sat in Alumni Hall to listen to President Cooper’s speech. Fewer than ten students attended.

George Cooper, August 2012. (Photo: Rachel Ward)

Planning for the future was the subject of President George Cooper’s annual address to King’s on Tuesday, Jan.7.
“I’ve called it the King’s annual update,” he said. “We talk about where we are and where we’re going.”
Professors from the Early Modern and Contemporary Studies programs, along with members of the King’s Student Union, the Bursar’s office and the Journalism school, sat in Alumni Hall to listen to President Cooper’s speech. Fewer than ten students attended.
Cooper made constant reference to the “strategic plan,” saying it’s designed to “preserve the eternal King’s” while progressing to the future.
“The face of Canada is changing fast, and our strategic plan takes account of this,” he said, referring to the growing cultural diversity in the country. “Our strategic plan calls for more international students.”
“A King’s education opens minds,” he continued. “Our vision is to lead students to original thinking.”
International students also pay an extra $273.40 per credit hour in differential fees. That means an extra $820.20 per half-year course.
Cooper stressed the importance of a liberal education, focusing on its practical benefits.
“People don’t hire for specific skills,” he said, describing how a liberal education makes students ready to adapt for any job.
He addressed the relation between King’s and Dalhousie.
“The folks at Dal can unintentionally overlook us,” he said, suggesting that King’s has to make its presence known to the larger Dalhousie community.
Other speakers, such as registrar Elizabeth Yeo and bursar Jim Fitzpatrick, said that King’s, like most universities, faces financial difficulties, but overall the campus is in good shape.
“The first goal for the bursar’s office is the long-time financial health of the university,” Fitzpatrick said. “This is far from a trivial undertaking.”
“For next year, things are looking well,” Yeo said, referring to the strong King’s enrolment numbers. “We will be updating the enrolment plan.”
“We’ve strengthened our financial integrity,” President Cooper said. “Our vision for King’s is right.”
 

By David J. Shuman

David is a second-year journalism student at King's, is engagement/news editor of The Watch, and a copy editor of The Pigeon. He writes on student politics, campus happenings, and school news. 

2 replies on “King’s president calls for increased international student enrolment”

And what will be done to ensure that International students will be treated as students and not money? What will be done to usher them into the King’s Community?

As an American, it cost me more than $2000 more than if I were a Canadian to take FYP. And most student loan companies will not loan if you plan to attend out of country. If it were possible to lower the differential fees, I believe there would be more Americans at King’s.

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